panaceachronicles

Pure, Natural Coca Leaf – A Healing Gift Of The Divine Plant

Poppy Juice, Synthetic Pills, & The Trap Of Addiction

Leave a comment

blogheading
“The Intercept” has just run an excellent piece outlining the lobbying efforts of the Opioid Manufacturing sector of the Pharmaceutical Industry to scuttle new Federal regulations that would attempt to make it harder for doctors to prescribe Opioid drugs like Oxycontin. The major manufacturers involved in the lobbying are Purdue, Cephalon, Endo, and Janssen (a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson).

The efforts of these parasitical manufacturers to maintain open season on the wholesale addicting of new “patients” while at the same time keeping up the flow of millions of tablets of these drugs that somehow manage to leak into the street market ( who, us?), is symptomatic of the thug-like nature of virtually the entire pharmaceutical industry.

When you look at the numbers you see that pills are the main “Opioid” killers, not Heroin, not Morphine, and certainly not Opium from the Poppy, and for all the hype about synthetic Opium pills like Oxy, the job they do of relieving pain is no better than a pipe of good opium. Of the 47,000+ drug overdose deaths counted by the CDC in 2014, 8800 were due to Heroin, which leaves +38,000 due largely to pills.

The single justification for the “Opioid” pill industry’s existence is that their products are claimed to be safer than natural Opium, Morphine, or Heroin. If you want to find the reason for the industry’s panic at the increase in Opioid pill deaths, look at the ratio between deaths from the dreaded slayer of youth Heroin and the supposedly safe if used as directed wonder pill.

If a huge part of your industry’s claim to fame is that your product is safer than the juice of the poppy then you have to be pretty upset when people are finally realizing that your pills are killing users nearly 5:1 compared to the fruits of the little flower.

Consider for a moment two possible tracks for our society – the one we are on and the one that could have been, and yet might be.

The track our society has taken is to turn our health, just like we’ve turned most of the other key aspects of our lives, over to highly intrusive institutional management. Most of us no longer have any management role in our food, our children’s education, our family and community security, our finances, or our privacy. One of the results of our capitulation to pervasive institutional management of our lives is that the exponentially-growing health industry, always quick to spot (or make) an opportunity, responded by creating vast numbers of expensive, enormously profitable drugs for all those astounding new diseases of modern society that patients are required to take by their doctors who give no natural options in place of the medical management system’s proprietary pharmaceuticals.

The second track, which might have been, is that all of the medical knowledge gained by doctors, patients and society at large in the 1700s and especially the 1800s regarding three of the great natural drugs – Opium, Coca and Cannabis – might have been kept and nurtured rather than discarded and largely forgotten. Had those three natural medicinal drugs not been demonized and outlawed as part of the warped spiritual movement of the early 1900s that gave birth first to Prohibition and later to the War On Drugs, these three great natural drugs would be available today as a part of the :People’s Pharmacy” just like hundreds of other herbal, natural medicines.

The industrial pharma industry would still have developed, and a lot of people would still be victims of their concoctions, but without the legal framework lovingly erected over decades by authoritarian conspirators there would be a whole segment of the Medical industry devoted to the use of all natural medicines, not just those permitted by the state as part of its role in enforcing the monopoly of Industrial Pharma over medicinal products.

Even more important, a nationwide, community-bases network of natural medicine practitioners would have evolved – people in every community who knew how to grow all of the ancient medical herbs and who utilized the advances of technology to produce ever-more effective but still natural medicines.

Of course we have a great model for this system in the network of Medical Cannabis growers and patients who are finally emerging after the long night of Prohibition – which is still in the very earliest stages of dawning – to point to and see what might have been for ALL the great natural medicines and not just Cannabis, and not just in a few states in the US and a few countries in the world.

In a society where those who wanted any form of any natural drug could grow and prepare it for themselves, or could go to a reputable dispensary or belong to a regulated collective, then we would certainly have some addicts among these people, but they would be able to lead as normal a life as they chose to live without the constant suffering, pain, and jeopardy of addiction to “illegal drugs” and all the horrors that go with that scene.

People with little income would not be driven to prostitute themselves and do violence to feed a drug habit if the drugs they wanted were freely available in safe, natural forms. It is possible, is it not, that given access to natural drugs in a climate free of violence and exploitation many if not most people could use drugs and still lead a normal life even if trapped in circumstances of poverty.

I believe that centuries of recorded experience in societies worldwide shows that the overwhelming problem with addiction is how society treats addicts. If an addict is free to lead an otherwise productive and normal life, many will do so, and those who won’t would have been lost whether drug laws made them criminals or not.

Perhaps what makes addiction so awful for so many people isn’t what the drug does to them, it’s what society does to them as a consequence of their addiction. The popular image of addiction is what is used to sell all the prevention/intervention programs that flourish around addicted people. Human degradation in every form is shown as a consequence of drug addiction, and many people buy that and think no further. But consider the number of people who are technically addicted who lead normal, productive lives in comparison with those whose lives are supposedly ruined by addiction, you begin to realize that plenty of people are addicted to drugs and other substances and don’t descend to street prostitution, emaciation, bleeding scabs and sleeping in alleys. It seems that one begins to see that maybe it is circumstances and not the drugs themselves that determine the direction that addiction takes. Remove all the harsh punishments for addiction and I wonder – what would happen to addiction?

If the illegal status of drugs and the consequences for addiction were removed, at least drug addiction would no longer be part of the trap that ensnares millions of people in the US. Poverty and exploitation would continue in other ways – unless of course (you never know) some kind of new dynamic was released in poor communities by removing the key role of criminalized drug addiction in keeping the iron collar of poverty and exploitation firmly clamped around their necks.

Author: panaceachronicles

I love creating, testing, and launching new ideas that work and that make a positive contribution to other peoples' lives. I love breaking trails and discovering hidden or new pathways, new ways of looking at special parts of the world, and most of all I love sharing what I find with others. I wrote the first Cannabis grow book “The Cultivators Handbook of Marijuana” in 1969. Cultivators has sold over 6 million copies worldwide & is still in print in 2016. I'm very happy to have been a part of the beginning of what is now a true revolution. I created The Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company in the early 1980's and invented the American Spirit™ brand. My hope is that many people who chose the organic tobacco alternative have enjoyed smoking a more natural product and been healthier because of it. I wrote the first Cannabis extraction/medical edibles book “Marijuana Foods” in the early 1980's. While Cannabis extracts for medicinal use go back thousands of years, many people in my generation had not even heard of Cannabis butter. I was happy to share what I discovered through research and experimentation. I wrote the first organic Tobacco grow book “The Cultivators Handbook of Natural Tobacco”. I know that in some parts of the country, growers are selling organic tobacco at farmers markets, and I still have hope that a networked collaborative industry can be organized as an alternative to the so-called "Tobacco Industry". I helped thousands of people to be better cross-cultural business communicators with the “International Straight Talk” video/CBT series in the 1990's. If you have the patience for some very old-style talking heads videos they are all digitized and online. A lot of culturally-astute people appear in these videos sharing valuable information. I re-introduced Coca Leaf to the natural medicines dialogue with “Panacea Chronicles” and “The Coca Leaf Papers” in 2010 – 2012. This is a digitized collection of core books on Coca from the 18th and 19th centuries, with a hyperlinked bibliography. I created this resource so that people could connect with Coca's relevance to core health issues in today's world through understanding its historical context. I just finished (2016) developing a market-disrupting line of Cannabis products for “Landrace Brands™”. I figured there was no reason a company run by people I care about to be just another me-too Cannabis industry startup, so we came up with a few surprises. I enjoyed this process and would like to do the same for other Cannabis market companies run by good people. I am currently researching and writing "Cannabis For Seniors: A Caregivers Handbook" to be published in 2017. I welcome your ideas for topics, and stories about how Cannabis has made a difference in your own life or in the life of someone you love. I am always looking for interesting new challenges. Is there anything that we should be discussing?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s