panaceachronicles

Thoughts On Coca, Cannabis, Opium & Tobacco – Gifts Of The Great Spirit

They Can’t Claim They Didn’t Know

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As of 2011 Federal law (cited below) specifically forbids tobacco manufacturers from using pesticide contaminated tobacco that exceeds US pesticide residue standards for domestic tobacco whether that tobacco is domestic or imported. Every tobacco company, US and international, is in gross, reckless and conspiratorial violation of this law.

The law has been on the books since 2011 but apparently nobody at FDA is testing, reporting, or investigating anything. I looked hard and saw zero evidence of concern but who knows, maybe I missed something.

Since I couldn’t find any evidence that FDA was doing its job, or get any response from them when I asked, I just paid for the lab tests that FDA should be doing and am publishing data below showing that every brand we tested violates 907(a)(1)(B) of Section 907 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. These products we tested and reported to FDA in January 2019 (Potential Tobacco Violation Report ID 19C00160“) should be re-tested on a national scale and if they are in violation they should be withdrawn and the manufacturers subjected at least to fines. I am of course holding my breath.

Here’s the core language of the Federal statute which along with the accompanying language gives any health authority at any level powers to act immediately in protection of public health and safety.  

907(a)(1)(B) of Section 907 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act: 
(B) ADDITIONAL SPECIAL RULE. “Beginning 2 years after the date of enactment of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, a tobacco product manufacturer shall not use tobacco, including foreign grown tobacco, that contains a pesticide chemical residue that is at a level greater than is specified by any tolerance applicable under Federal law to domestically grown tobacco.”

Here is violation of the law. 

Community Tobacco Control Partners Test Results 12/18

The law says and means “any tolerance” which means no DDT (zero tolerance under US law), no Carbendazim (zero tolerance under US law), and none of about 13 others just in the little sample of tobacco products we sampled in December 2018. The tobacco material in at least one of the products – Swisher Sweets – violates this law multiple times with contaminants that are a clear and present danger to public health.

The Feds know what the industry is doing, because they wrote this law forbidding it. But they have never published one single test or as far as I can tell conducted one inspection of pesticide residue contaminants in cigarettes or any other tobacco product, which means that since 2011 they haven’t prevented one single pregnant teen from inhaling DDT from a Swisher Sweet their older friends bought at the bodega. 

There are quite literally thousands of pregnant teens inhaling DDT today in the Us. The reason this is critically important is that DDT is a severe hazard to human fetal development. By imposing reasonable pesticide regulations based on existing, effective Cannabis pesticide limits in Oregon and other states, millions of smokers could be protected from exposure to pesticide residues in tobacco products (shown below) that are strongly associated with or in some cases proven to cause breast cancer, testicular cancer, obesity, diabetes, prostate cancer, liver cancer, childhood leukemia (ALL)atrophied testicles, compromised immunity and ruined HIV/AIDS treatments. And there’s more, but I hope this awful list of preventable slaughter is enough to demand that 907(a)(1)(B) of Section 907 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act: 
(B) ADDITIONAL SPECIAL RULE. be enforced. Here is the full data

Tobacco Product Pesticide ResidueTest Sample #1: 12/15/2018Community Tobacco Control Partnersbilldrake4470@gmail.com Comments  
 
 
Analyte Results/Units    
Exceed MRL   √      
Not Registered √√      
Banned/Zero Tolerance √√√      
RED = FUNGICIDE      
American Spirit (Cigarette)    
       
Azoxystrobin 0.936 mg/kg Exceeds 0.2 limit  
Imidacloprid 0.105 mg/kg Exceeds 0.4 limit  
Propamocarb √√ 0.252 mg/kg Not Registered  
Fluopyram √√ Trace Not Registered  
Spinosad Trace Under 0.2 limit  
       
       
Marlboro Red 100 (Cigarette)    
       
Azoxystrobin 0.897 mg/kg Exceeds 0.2 limit  
Bifenthrin 0.0870 mg/kg Under 0.2 limit  
Chlorantraniliprole 0.614 mg/kg Exceeds 0.2 limit  
Dimethomorph  √√ 0.0220 mg/kg Not Registered  
Metalaxyl 0.0780 mg/kg Under 0.2 limit  
Propamocarb √√ 0.129 mg/kg Not Registered  
Fluopicolide √√ Trace Not Registered  
Imidacloprid Trace Under 0.2 limit  
Penconazole √√ Trace Not Registered  
Trifloxystrobin Trace Under 0.2 limit  
       
       
Camel Classic (Cigarette)    
       
Azoxystrobin 0.875 mg/kg Exceeds 0.2 limit  
Chlorantraniliprole √ 0.377 mg/kg Exceeds 0.2 limit  
Dimethomorph √√ 0.0210 mg/kg Not Registered  
Imidacloprid 0.106 mg/kg 0.4  
Metalaxyl 0.0810 mg/kg 0.2  
MGK-264 0.0600 mg/kg 0.2  
Propamocarb √√ 0.167 mg/kg Not Registered  
Bifenthrin Trace 0.2  
Penconazole √√√ Trace Not Registered  
Piperonyl Butoxide Trace 2  
       
Swisher Sweet (Little Cigar)    
       
Acetamiprid 0.146 mg/kg 0.2  
Azoxystrobin 0.198 mg/kg 0.2  
Carbendazim √√√ 0.843 mg/kg BANNED  
Cypermethrin 0.443 mg/kg 1  
DDT, p,p-  √√√ 0.816 mg/kg BANNED  
Dimethomorph √√ 0.0380 mg/kg Not Registered  
Fenamidone √√ 0.0370 mg/kg Not Registered  
Imidacloprid 0.169 mg/kg 0.2  
Indoxacarb √√ 0.0790 mg/kg Not Registered  
Mandipropamid √√ 0.0770 mg/kg Not Registered  
Pendimethalin √√ 0.0910 mg/kg Not Registered  
Propamocarb √√ 0.0910 mg/kg Not Registered  
Pyraclostrobin √√ 0.0210 mg/kg Not Registered  
Chlorantraniliprole Trace 0.2  
Ethofenprox Trace 0.4  
MGK Trace 0.2  
Permethrin Trace 0.2  
Thiacloprid Trace 0.2  
       
Camel (Snus)    
       
Azoxystrobin 0.142 mg/kg 0.2  
Fluopyram √√ 0.0380 mg/kg Not Registered  
Bifenthrin Trace 0.2  
Mandipropamide Trace Not Registered  
Pendimethalin Trace Not Registered  

Author: panaceachronicles

When I was a child I moved around the world with my military family, always traveling by ship in the days before aircraft could cross oceans. I would spend hours on deck writing messages, sealing them with candle wax in bottles I snagged from somewhere on board, and then consigning them to the sea knowing in my heart that they were on their way to someone, somewhere who would read them. Sometime replies arrived at my grandparents’ house years later, and they would forward them to me wherever I was living. From these contacts I developed pen-pals who I stayed in touch with for many years. I was fortunate to develop, very early in my life, a sense of the network that invisibly but seamlessly connects us all. Thank you for picking up this message in a bottle, dear reader. We are here together.

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